Medical School

How to Interview Consultants

The appointment as a medical consultant in NHS is seen as the pinnacle of the medical career and rightly so. However, the role of the consultant in the new NHS has evolved to include increasing managerial responsibilities as well as an increased role at the sharp end in a consultant delivered (and not led!) services. Most would agree that it is the non clinical skills that separate good from the average candidate in the medical interview. Thus you should be uptodate in your knowledge of management and political topics. A sound knowledge of NHS structure and a political awareness will provide a framework within which you can apply your leadership and managerial skills. In your role as consultant, you will be very often called upon to develop and improve services, manage a team, deal with difficult colleagues, provide opinion on an ethical dilemma, participate and encourage teaching and research and resolve conflict.

In every answer you give, look for the opportunity to show the panel just how much wider reading you have done. You want to convince the panel that you will bring enhanced benefits to the organisation. Candidates will be remembered if they are distinctive, have something interesting to say and can make a unique contribution. Therefore consider what have you got that makes you special and what makes you fit in.
Remember success is 99% perspiration and 1% inspiration. Good luck!

Consultant Medical Interview Guide

Preparing For a Pharmaceutical Sales Interview

Are you fortunate enough to have an upcoming interview for medical school? If you’ve taken the big step and applied for admissions, there are some things that you can do to properly prepare yourself and put yourself ahead of your competitors.

Depending on the school, the interview panel will consist of faculty members and/or medical students. The panel may have one person or it may have five. It would be a good idea to familiarize yourself with the school’s process before going to the interview. No matter how many people are on the panel, or what the process is like, the expectations are the same. Every university is looking for the best candidates, and every candidate wants to gain admissions.

What the Panel is Looking for in a Candidate

If you have made it to the interview, it means that you have already proven yourself on paper. Now it is time to let yourself shine in person. The interview panel will want to see a lot of personality and confidence. You can expect to sell yourself to the panel. In order to do so you will need to boost your confidence. Ask yourself these three fundamental questions before going into the interview, and know the answers well.

The more rehearsed you are, the better – though you don’t want to appear robotic or scripted. Try to prepare yourself for the interview by getting to know some of the most common questions, and rehearsing the answers out loud.

Some common interview questions that you can expect are:

1. Tell me about yourself?

2. Why are you interested in becoming a doctor?

3. What are your greatest academic accomplishments?

4. Tell me about the Hippocratic Oath?

5. What have you done to prepare yourself for medical school?

6. What is your opinion of the insurance industry?

7. Why would you be a good doctor?

8. What has your pre-med experience been like?

9. Where do you see yourself in 10 years?

10. Do you have any questions for me?

Regarding question 10, the answer should always be yes. Always come prepared with questions. It shows that you are eager, prepared and serious about attending their school. Remember, it is all about standing out above the rest and letting your personality shine through.

Medicine Interview Preparation Courses

Matching to a residency program through the NRMP® (National Resident Matching Program) is a competitive endeavor. Even strong candidates - especially IMGs (international medical graduates) - can have difficulty getting positions in many specialties. Those that do match may not get their top choices, leaving them in suboptimal programs.

Consequently, optimizing your performance during the medical residency interview is critical. But what are residency directors looking for during the interview process?

First, they are seeking someone distinctive. Your goal is to distinguish yourself from all of the other applicants by showcasing your accomplishments. Anyone can say s/he is compassionate or hard working. Fewer candidates can prove it.

When choosing a residency admissions consulting company, a candidate should verify the company references and research its consultants. Elite companies that offer both the medical focus and a highly experienced consultant who works individually with clients offer a large advantage for pre-residency applicants, especially during these competitive times.

 Interview Skills Training 

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