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Medical Interview Prep

Interview preparation in any industry requires that you know what questions are likely to be asked so that you can formulate answers ahead of time, and rehearse your delivery. Typical interview questions and the kind of answers hiring managers are looking for are widely available online with just a little effort, even if you are interviewing for a sales job. But, medical sales interviews can involve more specialized questions than an average sales job, depending on the area you're in (laboratory, clinical diagnostics, biotechnology, imaging, pathology, hospital equipment, surgical supplies, medical device, or pharmaceutical), although the sales process is generally the same-the difference is in the details. And the details can be taken care of by careful research of the company and its products, goals, and culture.

Questions:

1. Are you in the right location? Will they have to relocate you? Are you even willing to move?

2. Can you travel? Most sales jobs require traveling to customers throughout your region, and medical sales are no exception.

3. Do you have the requirements? What experience/training/education do you have that qualifies you for this job?

11. What would you do...then they give you a tough sales scenario? This is a classic behavioral interview question. If you can, bring it around to something similar that did happen, and what you did about it.

12. How would you build your market? This is an excellent opportunity to introduce your 30/60/90-day sales plan, which you create out of your research on the company and the position. It's your "to do" list for exactly what you will do during your first 3 months of employment to learn your job, learn your customers, and build your market to increase sales.

For all these questions, the key is to listen, clarify, answer and then ask how they would answer that question. You can learn a lot-which will either impress them with your initiative and willingness to learn, or give you something you can use for your next interview.

A face-to-face interview is the toughest part of getting you a job. Further, if you are from a science or a medical background, the situation becomes worst. Science is a vast subject and you need to cover a great deal of topics before going for an interview. If you are a medical professional or a doctor then, you must know that a doctor’s job involves competence, technical expertise, integrity and social ethics. Therefore, a medical job interview┬áis considered to be one of the toughest job interviews.

This article covers a few questions that are generally asked in course of a medical interview. You need to go through this list and prepare potential, impressive answers for them. The first question is the most commonly asked questions. I have mentioned an answer to it.

7. The day before your final exam, one of your family members has expired. How will you deal with this situation? How will you manage your studies in such a crisis?

8. A young woman suffering from AIDS comes over to your clinic and requests you not to inform her spouse about it. What will you do?

9. A 7 year old child is suffering from cancer. The kid’s life expectancy is approximately five months. How will you tell her parents about it?

So, these were some of the question you may encounter on the road to become a doctor. You should answer them in a composed manner. And remember, besides being a doctor, you are a human too! So keep up the dignity of this post.

Medical Interview Prep

6 Tips For a Successful Medical Device Sales Job Interview

Tips on Interviewing for Medical Positions©

The primary goal of any job search campaign, including that within the health care sector is to garner the all-important interview. Whether you are seeking a position within hospital administration, a clinical role such as doctor or nurse, or even a clerical position, the interview is the pivotal point in your entire job search effort. Depending on how well you perform during this meeting, you will either advance or damage your candidacy.

Through adequate preparation, you can advance your candidacy, thereby greatly increasing your chances of being offered the job.

Interview Tip 1: Perform Research on the Employer

An important first step is to perform some research on the facility where you will be interviewing, whether that is a hospital setting, outpatient clinic, or private doctor's office. Review the facility Web site and jot down notes as you read. Critical information includes the facility mission statement, its history, scope of services, and staff bios, if available. Prepare a list of questions that shows you have performed some reading and are familiar with the facility.

A second strategy is to speak with those in the medical community who have some knowledge of the facility with regard to its reputation, financial stability, as well as overall culture. A viable source for this information with regard to a hospital setting is those physicians who have admitting privileges.

Patient care is truly a team effort. For any facility to work at its best there needs to be a good measure of synergy between clinical staff who provide direct patient care and administrative personnel who oversee daily operations.

During your interview you will want to exhibit a team orientation and "can-do" attitude. One way to do this is to talk about past situations where you worked as part of a team. This can be directly related to work or it can include experiences you have had as a volunteer or member of a sports team. The overriding goal is to show that you are a team play ready, willing, and able to contribute your efforts to the goals of your department.

Interview Tip 5: Interview Etiquette

Although many health care facilities may have a somewhat casual dress code (for staff not required to wear uniforms) be sure to "dress for success: and wear professional attire to your interview. Err on the side of being conservative with regard to jewelry, makeup, or cologne.

Do not staple or fold your resume but place it in a letter size envelope. If your resume is more than one page, use a paper clip on the upper left hand corner to keep the pages together. Be certain your cell phone is turned off, NOT set to vibrate (which can sound awfully loud should during any pause in the conversation.)

Medical School Interview Training Interview Preparation Questions

Consulting Case Interview Preparation Guide Part 1

https://medicalinterviewprep.co.uk/st-training/