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Tips on Interviewing for Medical Positions©

The primary goal of any job search campaign, including that within the health care sector is to garner the all-important interview. Whether you are seeking a position within hospital administration, a clinical role such as doctor or nurse, or even a clerical position, the interview is the pivotal point in your entire job search effort. Depending on how well you perform during this meeting, you will either advance or damage your candidacy.

Through adequate preparation, you can advance your candidacy, thereby greatly increasing your chances of being offered the job.

Interview Tip 1: Perform Research on the Employer

An important first step is to perform some research on the facility where you will be interviewing, whether that is a hospital setting, outpatient clinic, or private doctor's office. Review the facility Web site and jot down notes as you read. Critical information includes the facility mission statement, its history, scope of services, and staff bios, if available. Prepare a list of questions that shows you have performed some reading and are familiar with the facility.

A second strategy is to speak with those in the medical community who have some knowledge of the facility with regard to its reputation, financial stability, as well as overall culture. A viable source for this information with regard to a hospital setting is those physicians who have admitting privileges.

Patient care is truly a team effort. For any facility to work at its best there needs to be a good measure of synergy between clinical staff who provide direct patient care and administrative personnel who oversee daily operations.

During your interview you will want to exhibit a team orientation and "can-do" attitude. One way to do this is to talk about past situations where you worked as part of a team. This can be directly related to work or it can include experiences you have had as a volunteer or member of a sports team. The overriding goal is to show that you are a team play ready, willing, and able to contribute your efforts to the goals of your department.

Interview Tip 5: Interview Etiquette

Although many health care facilities may have a somewhat casual dress code (for staff not required to wear uniforms) be sure to "dress for success: and wear professional attire to your interview. Err on the side of being conservative with regard to jewelry, makeup, or cologne.

Do not staple or fold your resume but place it in a letter size envelope. If your resume is more than one page, use a paper clip on the upper left hand corner to keep the pages together. Be certain your cell phone is turned off, NOT set to vibrate (which can sound awfully loud should during any pause in the conversation.)

A face-to-face interview is the toughest part of getting you a job. Further, if you are from a science or a medical background, the situation becomes worst. Science is a vast subject and you need to cover a great deal of topics before going for an interview. If you are a medical professional or a doctor then, you must know that a doctor’s job involves competence, technical expertise, integrity and social ethics. Therefore, a medical job interview┬áis considered to be one of the toughest job interviews.

This article covers a few questions that are generally asked in course of a medical interview. You need to go through this list and prepare potential, impressive answers for them. The first question is the most commonly asked questions. I have mentioned an answer to it.

7. The day before your final exam, one of your family members has expired. How will you deal with this situation? How will you manage your studies in such a crisis?

8. A young woman suffering from AIDS comes over to your clinic and requests you not to inform her spouse about it. What will you do?

9. A 7 year old child is suffering from cancer. The kid’s life expectancy is approximately five months. How will you tell her parents about it?

So, these were some of the question you may encounter on the road to become a doctor. You should answer them in a composed manner. And remember, besides being a doctor, you are a human too! So keep up the dignity of this post.

Medical School Interview Courses

Management Consulting Interview - Beyond the Case Interview

To help you prepare for your Management Consultant Interview, here are some typical questions you can expect to hear...

Behaviour/Skill: Decisiveness

Definition: Takes personal responsibility for decisions having considered both the short and long term implications.

Questions:

1) Describe a situation where you were required to 'think on your feet' and come up with a quick decision in response to a colleague or customer:

a) What was the situation?

b) What was your immediate response?

c) What decision(s) did you arrive at?

d) What was the final outcome?

2) Tell us about a time when you had to analyze a problem based on incomplete information and decide on a solution:

a) What was the problem?

b) What was the information available?

c) What was the information missing?

d) What was your decision?

Behaviour/Skill: Teamwork

Definition: Working with others to accomplish objectives by respecting the needs and contributions of those involved.

Questions:

1) Can you give us examples of how you ensure that your team works as a cohesive unit towards goals?

a) Actions?

b) How define goals?

c) Results?

2) Can you give us an example of working with other areas of the office to ensure the efficiency of the business?

a) How were these measurement standards and/or feedback systems developed?

b) What useful information has the feedback given you?

c) Give one or two examples of how you personally have used this feedback?

d) What benefits has this delivered - for the business? For the customer?

Behaviour/Skill: Making Things Happen

Definition: Delivers results in line with strategic and operational plans. Has a 'can do, will do' approach to delivering consistently high performance and inspires others to also achieve high standards.

Questions:

1) Describe a project or task you managed which required you to organise scant resources to achieve an important deadline:

a) How did you determine your priorities?

b) Did you have to modify the plan?

2) Give an example of a time when you had to "juggle" a number of important activities or priorities at once:

a) What problems did this present you with?

b) What steps did you take to deal with the situation?

c) What was the final outcome?

These are typical questions which you can expect to be asked...so prepare with real examples and ensure you 'wow' the interviewer.

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Are You Ready For Your Job Interview With Stryker?

https://medicalinterviewprep.co.uk/st-training/