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The appointment as a medical consultant in NHS is seen as the pinnacle of the medical career and rightly so. However, the role of the consultant in the new NHS has evolved to include increasing managerial responsibilities as well as an increased role at the sharp end in a consultant delivered (and not led!) services. Most would agree that it is the non clinical skills that separate good from the average candidate in the medical interview. Thus you should be uptodate in your knowledge of management and political topics. A sound knowledge of NHS structure and a political awareness will provide a framework within which you can apply your leadership and managerial skills. In your role as consultant, you will be very often called upon to develop and improve services, manage a team, deal with difficult colleagues, provide opinion on an ethical dilemma, participate and encourage teaching and research and resolve conflict.

In every answer you give, look for the opportunity to show the panel just how much wider reading you have done. You want to convince the panel that you will bring enhanced benefits to the organisation. Candidates will be remembered if they are distinctive, have something interesting to say and can make a unique contribution. Therefore consider what have you got that makes you special and what makes you fit in.
Remember success is 99% perspiration and 1% inspiration. Good luck!

A face-to-face interview is the toughest part of getting you a job. Further, if you are from a science or a medical background, the situation becomes worst. Science is a vast subject and you need to cover a great deal of topics before going for an interview. If you are a medical professional or a doctor then, you must know that a doctor’s job involves competence, technical expertise, integrity and social ethics. Therefore, a medical job interview is considered to be one of the toughest job interviews.

This article covers a few questions that are generally asked in course of a medical interview. You need to go through this list and prepare potential, impressive answers for them. The first question is the most commonly asked questions. I have mentioned an answer to it.

7. The day before your final exam, one of your family members has expired. How will you deal with this situation? How will you manage your studies in such a crisis?

8. A young woman suffering from AIDS comes over to your clinic and requests you not to inform her spouse about it. What will you do?

9. A 7 year old child is suffering from cancer. The kid’s life expectancy is approximately five months. How will you tell her parents about it?

So, these were some of the question you may encounter on the road to become a doctor. You should answer them in a composed manner. And remember, besides being a doctor, you are a human too! So keep up the dignity of this post.

Mmi Medical School Sample Questions

Business Consulting Interviews - 10 Important Steps to Prepare

Tips on Interviewing for Medical Positions©

The primary goal of any job search campaign, including that within the health care sector is to garner the all-important interview. Whether you are seeking a position within hospital administration, a clinical role such as doctor or nurse, or even a clerical position, the interview is the pivotal point in your entire job search effort. Depending on how well you perform during this meeting, you will either advance or damage your candidacy.

Through adequate preparation, you can advance your candidacy, thereby greatly increasing your chances of being offered the job.

Interview Tip 1: Perform Research on the Employer

An important first step is to perform some research on the facility where you will be interviewing, whether that is a hospital setting, outpatient clinic, or private doctor's office. Review the facility Web site and jot down notes as you read. Critical information includes the facility mission statement, its history, scope of services, and staff bios, if available. Prepare a list of questions that shows you have performed some reading and are familiar with the facility.

A second strategy is to speak with those in the medical community who have some knowledge of the facility with regard to its reputation, financial stability, as well as overall culture. A viable source for this information with regard to a hospital setting is those physicians who have admitting privileges.

Patient care is truly a team effort. For any facility to work at its best there needs to be a good measure of synergy between clinical staff who provide direct patient care and administrative personnel who oversee daily operations.

During your interview you will want to exhibit a team orientation and "can-do" attitude. One way to do this is to talk about past situations where you worked as part of a team. This can be directly related to work or it can include experiences you have had as a volunteer or member of a sports team. The overriding goal is to show that you are a team play ready, willing, and able to contribute your efforts to the goals of your department.

Interview Tip 5: Interview Etiquette

Although many health care facilities may have a somewhat casual dress code (for staff not required to wear uniforms) be sure to "dress for success: and wear professional attire to your interview. Err on the side of being conservative with regard to jewelry, makeup, or cologne.

Do not staple or fold your resume but place it in a letter size envelope. If your resume is more than one page, use a paper clip on the upper left hand corner to keep the pages together. Be certain your cell phone is turned off, NOT set to vibrate (which can sound awfully loud should during any pause in the conversation.)

Medical School Interview Courses Online Interview Coaching

Interview Questions to Ask a Potential Medical Billing and Coding Specialist

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Consultant Medical Interview Questions And Answers [tag]

Medical School Interview Courses

You are what you wear, and the clothes make the man, so they say. While you got your management consulting interview based on your hard work and credentials, you cannot discount the impact that visual impressions contribute to the overall picture. How you appear and the attire you wear will convey a serious message to your hiring committee. There are some simple ways to guarantee that you will look professional. Just follow some basic rules on what to and what not to wear.

Human resources executives at McKinsey and BCG, among others, widely concur that simplicity is key in choosing your interview wardrobe. You should avoid wearing anything flashy or over the top. You want to look smart and put together, which means you need to pay attention to the details, such as pressing your suit the night before. You don't want to show up for your management consulting interview looking like you gathered your clothing from the bottom of the laundry hamper or a suitcase. All of this may seem basic in terms of interviewing etiquette, but according to current employees at Booz, they have seen it all. Wrinkles, among other little visual details, may leave a lasting - and negative - impression in the minds of the hiring committee.

AT Kearney consultants recommend, as most management consulting teams do, that the key to dressing appropriately for your interview is to keep it simple and comfortable. You don't want to wear restrictive clothing that cuts off the circulation mid-meeting or trip over your own feet because you insisted on wearing impractically high four-inch high heels.

Dress for success and never overdo it. The last thing you want to do during your management consulting interview is worry about a wardrobe malfunction or whether your outfit is costing you the job. By focusing less on the wardrobe, and paying attention to the overall impression you are making, you will be able to spend more time honing your interviewing skills and researching the company.

Take the route of least resistance when it comes to selecting your wardrobe. Think business attire, and don't deviate from the plan. It is better to be a little understated than over the top.

A face-to-face interview is the toughest part of getting you a job. Further, if you are from a science or a medical background, the situation becomes worst. Science is a vast subject and you need to cover a great deal of topics before going for an interview. If you are a medical professional or a doctor then, you must know that a doctor’s job involves competence, technical expertise, integrity and social ethics. Therefore, a medical job interview is considered to be one of the toughest job interviews.

This article covers a few questions that are generally asked in course of a medical interview. You need to go through this list and prepare potential, impressive answers for them. The first question is the most commonly asked questions. I have mentioned an answer to it.

7. The day before your final exam, one of your family members has expired. How will you deal with this situation? How will you manage your studies in such a crisis?

8. A young woman suffering from AIDS comes over to your clinic and requests you not to inform her spouse about it. What will you do?

9. A 7 year old child is suffering from cancer. The kid’s life expectancy is approximately five months. How will you tell her parents about it?

So, these were some of the question you may encounter on the road to become a doctor. You should answer them in a composed manner. And remember, besides being a doctor, you are a human too! So keep up the dignity of this post.

Medical Interview Prep

Medical School Interview Questions

To help you prepare for your Management Consultant Interview, here are some typical questions you can expect to hear...

Behaviour/Skill: Decisiveness

Definition: Takes personal responsibility for decisions having considered both the short and long term implications.

Questions:

1) Describe a situation where you were required to 'think on your feet' and come up with a quick decision in response to a colleague or customer:

a) What was the situation?

b) What was your immediate response?

c) What decision(s) did you arrive at?

d) What was the final outcome?

2) Tell us about a time when you had to analyze a problem based on incomplete information and decide on a solution:

a) What was the problem?

b) What was the information available?

c) What was the information missing?

d) What was your decision?

Behaviour/Skill: Teamwork

Definition: Working with others to accomplish objectives by respecting the needs and contributions of those involved.

Questions:

1) Can you give us examples of how you ensure that your team works as a cohesive unit towards goals?

a) Actions?

b) How define goals?

c) Results?

2) Can you give us an example of working with other areas of the office to ensure the efficiency of the business?

a) How were these measurement standards and/or feedback systems developed?

b) What useful information has the feedback given you?

c) Give one or two examples of how you personally have used this feedback?

d) What benefits has this delivered - for the business? For the customer?

Behaviour/Skill: Making Things Happen

Definition: Delivers results in line with strategic and operational plans. Has a 'can do, will do' approach to delivering consistently high performance and inspires others to also achieve high standards.

Questions:

1) Describe a project or task you managed which required you to organise scant resources to achieve an important deadline:

a) How did you determine your priorities?

b) Did you have to modify the plan?

2) Give an example of a time when you had to "juggle" a number of important activities or priorities at once:

a) What problems did this present you with?

b) What steps did you take to deal with the situation?

c) What was the final outcome?

These are typical questions which you can expect to be asked...so prepare with real examples and ensure you 'wow' the interviewer.

Medical School Interview Coaching Interview Preparation Questions

How to Succeed in Medical Assistant Interview?

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Medical Interview Prep [tag]

Medical School Interview Coaching

Management consulting interviews are notorious for case studies. They are not your standard job interview, but rather a series of case descriptions and hypothetical or theoretical problems in business, which are expected to be analyzed or solved by the candidate. Preparation for such interviews is crucial to success and getting hired with a top management consulting firm.

Firms, such as McKinsey or Bain present a series of case studies during the interviewing process. The skills necessary to successfully perform on a case study interview are the similar skills needed to work effectively as a management consultant. Management consulting experts are required to understand the basic concepts in business, such as market structure or financials, as well as think analytically and in a highly structured manner. A management consultant's daily job basically consists of real-life case studies, so the case study exercise in an interview setting provides the hiring committee an active assessment of how well the candidate performs in core firm activities.

The case study is valued so highly that you performance on this task accounts for at least 50% of your determining score. It cannot be emphasized enough that it is crucial for you to prepare for these kinds of interviews. Doing well on this portion of the management consulting interview weighs heavily on you getting hired by the firm. If you are looking for an offer at one of the leading consulting firms, the best thing to do is practice, practice and practice some more. You cannot practice enough for the case study stage of the interview; when you are sure you have done enough, you need to go back and do more.

Landing a job at a management consulting firm is no easy task, but you can increase your chances of getting hired by doing your homework ahead of time. Take the case study interview portion of the hiring process seriously and land the job of your dreams.

A face-to-face interview is the toughest part of getting you a job. Further, if you are from a science or a medical background, the situation becomes worst. Science is a vast subject and you need to cover a great deal of topics before going for an interview. If you are a medical professional or a doctor then, you must know that a doctor’s job involves competence, technical expertise, integrity and social ethics. Therefore, a medical job interview is considered to be one of the toughest job interviews.

This article covers a few questions that are generally asked in course of a medical interview. You need to go through this list and prepare potential, impressive answers for them. The first question is the most commonly asked questions. I have mentioned an answer to it.

7. The day before your final exam, one of your family members has expired. How will you deal with this situation? How will you manage your studies in such a crisis?

8. A young woman suffering from AIDS comes over to your clinic and requests you not to inform her spouse about it. What will you do?

9. A 7 year old child is suffering from cancer. The kid’s life expectancy is approximately five months. How will you tell her parents about it?

So, these were some of the question you may encounter on the road to become a doctor. You should answer them in a composed manner. And remember, besides being a doctor, you are a human too! So keep up the dignity of this post.

Mmi Medical School Sample Questions

6 Tips For a Successful Medical Device Sales Job Interview

We are going to discuss some medical school interview questions with you. These are the sorts of questions that interested medical students have to answer before they can get a seat in any of the reputed medical institutions. Closely study these questions and prepare yourself for the big day.

A very general question is enquiring the reason behind your desire to become a doctor. You should have a clear idea of your goal. Do not sound vague. Make sure that your answer is convincing enough. It is good to have a unique dream but you should back it up with your conviction.

It would do a student enormous good if they spend some time in understanding the relationship between science and medicine. You should be aware of the social norms and medical rules of your country. You also need to know the problems that the healthcare system of your country has.

So, go ahead and face the interview with confidence. Success will be yours.

Mmi Interview Coaching Medical Consultant Interview

Great Tips For a Medical Interview

https://medicalinterviewprep.co.uk/st-training/

ST Training General Practice

Medical School Interview Coaching [tag]

Consultant Interview Course Online

Tips on Interviewing for Medical Positions©

The primary goal of any job search campaign, including that within the health care sector is to garner the all-important interview. Whether you are seeking a position within hospital administration, a clinical role such as doctor or nurse, or even a clerical position, the interview is the pivotal point in your entire job search effort. Depending on how well you perform during this meeting, you will either advance or damage your candidacy.

Through adequate preparation, you can advance your candidacy, thereby greatly increasing your chances of being offered the job.

Interview Tip 1: Perform Research on the Employer

An important first step is to perform some research on the facility where you will be interviewing, whether that is a hospital setting, outpatient clinic, or private doctor's office. Review the facility Web site and jot down notes as you read. Critical information includes the facility mission statement, its history, scope of services, and staff bios, if available. Prepare a list of questions that shows you have performed some reading and are familiar with the facility.

A second strategy is to speak with those in the medical community who have some knowledge of the facility with regard to its reputation, financial stability, as well as overall culture. A viable source for this information with regard to a hospital setting is those physicians who have admitting privileges.

Patient care is truly a team effort. For any facility to work at its best there needs to be a good measure of synergy between clinical staff who provide direct patient care and administrative personnel who oversee daily operations.

During your interview you will want to exhibit a team orientation and "can-do" attitude. One way to do this is to talk about past situations where you worked as part of a team. This can be directly related to work or it can include experiences you have had as a volunteer or member of a sports team. The overriding goal is to show that you are a team play ready, willing, and able to contribute your efforts to the goals of your department.

Interview Tip 5: Interview Etiquette

Although many health care facilities may have a somewhat casual dress code (for staff not required to wear uniforms) be sure to "dress for success: and wear professional attire to your interview. Err on the side of being conservative with regard to jewelry, makeup, or cologne.

Do not staple or fold your resume but place it in a letter size envelope. If your resume is more than one page, use a paper clip on the upper left hand corner to keep the pages together. Be certain your cell phone is turned off, NOT set to vibrate (which can sound awfully loud should during any pause in the conversation.)

A face-to-face interview is the toughest part of getting you a job. Further, if you are from a science or a medical background, the situation becomes worst. Science is a vast subject and you need to cover a great deal of topics before going for an interview. If you are a medical professional or a doctor then, you must know that a doctor’s job involves competence, technical expertise, integrity and social ethics. Therefore, a medical job interview is considered to be one of the toughest job interviews.

This article covers a few questions that are generally asked in course of a medical interview. You need to go through this list and prepare potential, impressive answers for them. The first question is the most commonly asked questions. I have mentioned an answer to it.

7. The day before your final exam, one of your family members has expired. How will you deal with this situation? How will you manage your studies in such a crisis?

8. A young woman suffering from AIDS comes over to your clinic and requests you not to inform her spouse about it. What will you do?

9. A 7 year old child is suffering from cancer. The kid’s life expectancy is approximately five months. How will you tell her parents about it?

So, these were some of the question you may encounter on the road to become a doctor. You should answer them in a composed manner. And remember, besides being a doctor, you are a human too! So keep up the dignity of this post.

Mmi Interview Coaching

Consulting Case Interview Preparation Guide Part 1

Are you fortunate enough to have an upcoming interview for medical school? If you've taken the big step and applied for admissions, there are some things that you can do to properly prepare yourself and put yourself ahead of your competitors.

Depending on the school, the interview panel will consist of faculty members and/or medical students. The panel may have one person or it may have five. It would be a good idea to familiarize yourself with the school's process before going to the interview. No matter how many people are on the panel, or what the process is like, the expectations are the same. Every university is looking for the best candidates, and every candidate wants to gain admissions.

What the Panel is Looking for in a Candidate

If you have made it to the interview, it means that you have already proven yourself on paper. Now it is time to let yourself shine in person. The interview panel will want to see a lot of personality and confidence. You can expect to sell yourself to the panel. In order to do so you will need to boost your confidence. Ask yourself these three fundamental questions before going into the interview, and know the answers well.

The more rehearsed you are, the better - though you don't want to appear robotic or scripted. Try to prepare yourself for the interview by getting to know some of the most common questions, and rehearsing the answers out loud.

Some common interview questions that you can expect are:

1. Tell me about yourself?

2. Why are you interested in becoming a doctor?

3. What are your greatest academic accomplishments?

4. Tell me about the Hippocratic Oath?

5. What have you done to prepare yourself for medical school?

6. What is your opinion of the insurance industry?

7. Why would you be a good doctor?

8. What has your pre-med experience been like?

9. Where do you see yourself in 10 years?

10. Do you have any questions for me?

Regarding question 10, the answer should always be yes. Always come prepared with questions. It shows that you are eager, prepared and serious about attending their school. Remember, it is all about standing out above the rest and letting your personality shine through.

Medical Interview Courses Uk Tips For Interview

Great Tips For a Medical Interview

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ST Training Immunology

Medical School Interview Coaching [tag]

Mmi Medical School Sample Questions

Interview preparation in any industry requires that you know what questions are likely to be asked so that you can formulate answers ahead of time, and rehearse your delivery. Typical interview questions and the kind of answers hiring managers are looking for are widely available online with just a little effort, even if you are interviewing for a sales job. But, medical sales interviews can involve more specialized questions than an average sales job, depending on the area you're in (laboratory, clinical diagnostics, biotechnology, imaging, pathology, hospital equipment, surgical supplies, medical device, or pharmaceutical), although the sales process is generally the same-the difference is in the details. And the details can be taken care of by careful research of the company and its products, goals, and culture.

Questions:

1. Are you in the right location? Will they have to relocate you? Are you even willing to move?

2. Can you travel? Most sales jobs require traveling to customers throughout your region, and medical sales are no exception.

3. Do you have the requirements? What experience/training/education do you have that qualifies you for this job?

11. What would you do...then they give you a tough sales scenario? This is a classic behavioral interview question. If you can, bring it around to something similar that did happen, and what you did about it.

12. How would you build your market? This is an excellent opportunity to introduce your 30/60/90-day sales plan, which you create out of your research on the company and the position. It's your "to do" list for exactly what you will do during your first 3 months of employment to learn your job, learn your customers, and build your market to increase sales.

For all these questions, the key is to listen, clarify, answer and then ask how they would answer that question. You can learn a lot-which will either impress them with your initiative and willingness to learn, or give you something you can use for your next interview.

A face-to-face interview is the toughest part of getting you a job. Further, if you are from a science or a medical background, the situation becomes worst. Science is a vast subject and you need to cover a great deal of topics before going for an interview. If you are a medical professional or a doctor then, you must know that a doctor’s job involves competence, technical expertise, integrity and social ethics. Therefore, a medical job interview is considered to be one of the toughest job interviews.

This article covers a few questions that are generally asked in course of a medical interview. You need to go through this list and prepare potential, impressive answers for them. The first question is the most commonly asked questions. I have mentioned an answer to it.

7. The day before your final exam, one of your family members has expired. How will you deal with this situation? How will you manage your studies in such a crisis?

8. A young woman suffering from AIDS comes over to your clinic and requests you not to inform her spouse about it. What will you do?

9. A 7 year old child is suffering from cancer. The kid’s life expectancy is approximately five months. How will you tell her parents about it?

So, these were some of the question you may encounter on the road to become a doctor. You should answer them in a composed manner. And remember, besides being a doctor, you are a human too! So keep up the dignity of this post.

Consultant Interview Course Online

How To Prepare For Case Studies In Management Consulting Interviews

Matching to a residency program through the NRMP® (National Resident Matching Program) is a competitive endeavor. Even strong candidates - especially IMGs (international medical graduates) - can have difficulty getting positions in many specialties. Those that do match may not get their top choices, leaving them in suboptimal programs.

Consequently, optimizing your performance during the medical residency interview is critical. But what are residency directors looking for during the interview process?

First, they are seeking someone distinctive. Your goal is to distinguish yourself from all of the other applicants by showcasing your accomplishments. Anyone can say s/he is compassionate or hard working. Fewer candidates can prove it.

When choosing a residency admissions consulting company, a candidate should verify the company references and research its consultants. Elite companies that offer both the medical focus and a highly experienced consultant who works individually with clients offer a large advantage for pre-residency applicants, especially during these competitive times.

Medical School Interview Book Online Interview Course

Consulting Jobs - How to Pass the Interview

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ST Training Plastic Surgery

Consultant Medical Interview Questions And Answers [tag]

Medical Interview Courses Uk

There are a lot of articles on how to prepare for the interview, but knowing what not to do is often as important as knowing what to do.

Our team of medical recruiters see these 7 mistakes over and over. Make sure you do not make any of these blunders during your next medical sales interview.

1. Not dressing for the job
2. Not bringing copies of your resume
3. Texting or picking up a phone on a ride along
4. Not having good questions for the hiring manager
5. Talking about salary/ commission before the interviewer brings it up
6. Talking negatively about your old company/boss
7. Not asking for the job

1. Talking about salary/commission before the interviewer brings it up. We all know medical sales representatives should be money motivated and commission driven, but do not make the mistake of just talking about money and how much commission you can make. Never bring up money before the interviewer does. Sales Managers want someone who is going to drive the sales and wants to make great money, but more importantly they want someone who has a proven track record of success, knows products, the territory, culture of the company and can be a team player. Let the hiring manager find out about you and lead the money conversation.

6. Talking negatively about your old company/boss. Another question that always comes up on an interview is "Tell me why you are looking." At this point do not blunder and say anything negative about your current company or boss, even if that is exactly why you are looking. Managers will be wary of you and think you do not get along with others and may even be concerned you will speak badly of them in the future.

7. Not asking for the job. Sales 101, always close the interview. Sales managers are going to think you will not ask for the business if you cannot ask for the job. Always close the interview by letting the hiring manager know you are interested. More candidates are knocked out of the interview process for this blunder.

Now that you have read our Top 7 Blunders during a Medical Sales Interview, you will be sure not to make them on your next interview and be well on your way to you dream medical sales job.

A face-to-face interview is the toughest part of getting you a job. Further, if you are from a science or a medical background, the situation becomes worst. Science is a vast subject and you need to cover a great deal of topics before going for an interview. If you are a medical professional or a doctor then, you must know that a doctor’s job involves competence, technical expertise, integrity and social ethics. Therefore, a medical job interview is considered to be one of the toughest job interviews.

This article covers a few questions that are generally asked in course of a medical interview. You need to go through this list and prepare potential, impressive answers for them. The first question is the most commonly asked questions. I have mentioned an answer to it.

7. The day before your final exam, one of your family members has expired. How will you deal with this situation? How will you manage your studies in such a crisis?

8. A young woman suffering from AIDS comes over to your clinic and requests you not to inform her spouse about it. What will you do?

9. A 7 year old child is suffering from cancer. The kid’s life expectancy is approximately five months. How will you tell her parents about it?

So, these were some of the question you may encounter on the road to become a doctor. You should answer them in a composed manner. And remember, besides being a doctor, you are a human too! So keep up the dignity of this post.

Medical Interview Prep

Job Interview Questions - What to Say in a Medical Sales Interview

STRUCTURE OF THE ST INTERVIEW

ST interviews normally last 30 to 40 minutes and are made up of three or four stations, each with a different theme. The exact duration, the number of stations and the themes will depend on each specialty, but are usually 10-12-minute long. Note that, as always, there are exceptions as some candidates have had interviews that included one single 30-minute station (more or less alongside the format of the "old" SHO or SpR interviews).

The type of stations vary from specialty to specialty, and in fact also from deanery to deanery. For example, some anaesthetics candidates in London have had almost exclusively clinical scenarios, whereas in Manchester the interviews were more balanced.

Globally speaking you are likely to have three or four stations taken from the following types:

Clinical station

This normally includes a range of clinical scenarios (e.g. emergencies) that you would normally be expected to handle. Some of the scenarios are straight forward, but others may be stretching you a little (i.e. you may not have met such situations in the past, but the interviewers would expect you to have a good educated guess).

Practical station

In some specialties, candidates may be asked to demonstrate practical procedures (e.g. intubating a dummy in anaesthesia, or suturing a tomato in ophthalmology). There is absolutely nothing that you can do to prepare for this station. Either you know or you don't. Practical stations tend to be reserved for surgery-related specialties.

General, Motivation & Teaching station

A number of deaneries and specialties have stations that are designated for generic questions. These tend to relate to your interest in the specialty and the deanery, together with your career plans and the manner in which you have developed your interest in the specialty. Usually the general station also deals with teaching skills.

Academic & Clinical Governance station

Most interviews will have an academic station. In some interviews, there can actually be two academic stations (e.g. one specifically on Research and Audit, and another one on other topics such as Teaching and Risk Management.

Academic stations take the form of a traditional question and answer session. For example you may be asked to talk about your most interesting audit. The interviewers will then dig into the detail of your experience e.g. how you selected the standard, what you role was, what changed as a result, etc.

Other questions will include your experience of Research, what you understand about research principles, questions on the importance of Research etc. Such questions can be daunting at first, but if you are well prepared, you can really shine.

Critical Appraisal station

In several specialties (e.g. ophthalmology, general surgery), candidates have been asked to critically appraise a paper, at all ST levels, including ST1.

Preparation time varied between 20 and 40 minutes, followed by a 5 to 10 minute presentation. As part of a critical appraisal station, you are expected to demonstrate an understanding of how critical appraisals should be approached and you should also be able to answer any questions that the interviewers have on the paper that you have just read. This could include questions of a clinical nature, based on the topic being discussed; it also often includes questions on research principles such as "What is a p-value?" or "What are the ethical issues involved in this paper?".

Experience of research is a definite advantage to succeed in this station. Having said that, attendance at journal clubs is also a good way of preparing yourself for it, particularly at the lower ST grades.

Role Play

In some specialties, role play has been introduced. Role play was already an integral part of SpR interviews for some specialties such as Obs & Gynae but it has been extended to other specialties in some of the deaneries, including psychiatry (e.g. dealing with a father who wants some news on his over-18 admitted daughter), ophthalmology (e.g. breaking bad news and counselling a patient on glaucoma) and several others.

In many ways, role-play stations are similar to those used for the recruitment of GP trainees. Their main aim is not to test your clinical skills & knowledge (this is achieved in others ways in proper clinical stations) but to test your approach towards patients and your communication skills. The clinical content of the role play section is therefore limited as they concentrate instead on your empathy, your listening skills, your ability to summarise information in a simple language, your ability to deal with anger and conflict calmly and sensibly, and your ability to build a rapport with a patient in sometimes difficult circumstances.

The role play stations usually include actors who have been briefed accordingly. Having said that, the role is sometimes played by an interviewer. There have been occasions where role-play was introduced unexpectedly in a normal clinical station, or an ethics station. The station would start normally with a few general question such as "How would you deal with a patient who ...". Half-way through the station one of the interviewers will tell you that he is now the patient and that he wants you to act your answer out. This can be somewhat disconcerting and you should therefore be prepared for the worst, even if you have not explicitly been told that you will have a role play station.

TIP 4: Organise your answers

Many candidates' answers are made up of a long list of ideas, most of which are irrelevant or not backed up. There is no point putting across 20 ideas if the average human being can only remember 3 or 4 ideas at a time. You will just drown your interviewers in a mass of information they can't digest. As a result they will either lose interest and start looking through the window, or they will get a headache trying to make sense of it all. Put yourself in their shoes! They have been sitting there listening to the same old answers from everyone. Make their job easy, don't make them think too much, organise the information for them. In our experience, those who get the jobs are not those who have an absolutely flawless content in their answers. They are those who have a good structure and make them personal, even if they only have 70% of the expected content.

TIP 5: be personal

For each question, there are a number of points that can be raised. Most people who have prepared will automatically come up with these points and, in order to make a difference, you will need to personalise your answers otherwise you will sound the same as everyone else. Depending on the question that you have been asked, this can be achieved in different ways.

If the question is about your interpersonal skills, try to bring in a few examples that

demonstrate your experience. For example when discussing team playing, describe

situations where you gained experience of team work. You should not go into too much detail but be specific enough to be credible.

Steer clear of definitions and grand statements. An interview is a conversation, not a speech or a verbal essay. You need to appear natural and confident in what you say. Do not be scared of expressing your ideas in your own words. For example, when is the last time you used the word "flourish" at home or at work? So why insist in using it in your description of Clinical Governance? Too many people try to explain simple ideas using pompous words because they feel it makes them sound better. In reality it makes them sound vague, theoretical and, sometimes, confused ... the interviewers are confused too.

Don't be afraid of expressing how you feel, what you liked, why you enjoyed it, etc. They want to recruit human beings, not clones. Also, talking about feelings helps being out your enthusiasm and passion for what you do. No one has ever sounded passionate talking about.

TIP 6: Stop obsessing about your body language

There is little point in worrying about how you cross you fingers or your legs if what comes out of your mouth makes no sense. Body language is not part of the marking sheet interviewers have. In fact most people will ignore your body language unless it is really bad, in which case it most probably means that you have very little confidence and therefore that your answers are also very bad.

Most people have a normal body language and interviewers will make allowances for the fact that you are a bit nervous. If you spend the time preparing well for your interview, you will gain much more confidence in yourself and your body language will follow naturally. The more you think about your body, the less you are able to think about your answers.

TIP 7: Do not spend month learning about the minutia of NHS issues

There is always a danger in knowing too much about one subject: they can ask you for more detail until you fall on your own sword. At our last count, there were over 95 possible NHS issues you could be asked at an interview. Even if you spend just 20 minutes on each, it would still take you over 30 hours of work. And that's just for the basics.

Instead concentrate and spend some proper time on 5 or 6 key issues of importance either because they are of actuality or because they are of close concern to your specialty. But do not confine yourself to learning the basic facts otherwise you will go back to the realm of ready-made answers. At ST interviews, you will be expected to show an understanding of the issue but also of it consequences and practical applications. So spend your time wisely by discussing the issues with colleagues and debating them. You will then start thinking about those issues in different ways and will gain a personal understanding of them that will enable you to discuss them freely at a medical interview.

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In general, case interview is very common in interviews with consulting companies, interviewer will measure a candidate's attitude toward risk and comprehensive logical analysis ability with some cases, to see whether a candidate is flexible and can adapt quickly.

There are two stages of case interview: preparative stage and formal case interview stage. During the preparative stage, you may need to introduce yourself. Then answer the interviewer's question about your resume and some broadly issues about personal considerations.

The next stage is a formal case interview. Case interview is to draw a conclusion about some business issues with analysis. Unlike other kinds of interviews, case interview is an interactive process. You will get some business issues from the interviewer and are required to provide an analysis and advice on these issues. Your task is to put forward some logical questions to the interviewer in order that you could have more comprehensive and detailed realization on these issues, and finally give a conclusion through systematic analysis.

Please keep in mind there are not absolutely correct answers in case interview, interviewer concerned about your analytical ability and creativity exhibited during the interview, but not the answer.

Purpose of case interview

Consultant will spend lots of time with their clients and colleagues for the purpose of intercommunion, and they were required to have some special qualities in order to succeed in consulting projects. These qualities include: ability to remain calm under pressure, ability to quickly established an assumption according to the details of projects, and make a conclusion depend on strong logical analysis capability and so on. Therefore, the cases interview which highly interactive and tight bounds for practical as well as strong requirement analysis skill would let interviewer evaluate the qualities of candidates effectively.

Same as the other case interviews, it is not very important to get a correct answer, but the method you decomposed a large-scale project into several small-scale projects and resolve each one respectively is really the most crucial, as well as you should have some common sense to answer these kinds of question.

Business cases

For business cases interviews, the most common case is that interviewer ask you how to analyze an project according to the description of project background such as market entry, profit decline, industry analysis, sales decline and so on. The interviewer always doesn't provide you enough detailed information, so you need to keep on asking targeted questions in order to get more useful information.

Brainteasers

Brainteasers are often very hard and very tricky questions that include mystery question and numerical estimates question. The purpose of these questions is to inspect your creativity and ability to analyze and resolve issues under pressure.

In general, case interview will include either a long time business case, or two short time cases: almost inevitably one should be guesstimates and the other one might be brainteasers or a short time business cases.

A face-to-face interview is the toughest part of getting you a job. Further, if you are from a science or a medical background, the situation becomes worst. Science is a vast subject and you need to cover a great deal of topics before going for an interview. If you are a medical professional or a doctor then, you must know that a doctor’s job involves competence, technical expertise, integrity and social ethics. Therefore, a medical job interview is considered to be one of the toughest job interviews.

This article covers a few questions that are generally asked in course of a medical interview. You need to go through this list and prepare potential, impressive answers for them. The first question is the most commonly asked questions. I have mentioned an answer to it.

7. The day before your final exam, one of your family members has expired. How will you deal with this situation? How will you manage your studies in such a crisis?

8. A young woman suffering from AIDS comes over to your clinic and requests you not to inform her spouse about it. What will you do?

9. A 7 year old child is suffering from cancer. The kid’s life expectancy is approximately five months. How will you tell her parents about it?

So, these were some of the question you may encounter on the road to become a doctor. You should answer them in a composed manner. And remember, besides being a doctor, you are a human too! So keep up the dignity of this post.

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Great Tips For a Medical Interview

Management consulting interviews are notorious for case studies. They are not your standard job interview, but rather a series of case descriptions and hypothetical or theoretical problems in business, which are expected to be analyzed or solved by the candidate. Preparation for such interviews is crucial to success and getting hired with a top management consulting firm.

Firms, such as McKinsey or Bain present a series of case studies during the interviewing process. The skills necessary to successfully perform on a case study interview are the similar skills needed to work effectively as a management consultant. Management consulting experts are required to understand the basic concepts in business, such as market structure or financials, as well as think analytically and in a highly structured manner. A management consultant's daily job basically consists of real-life case studies, so the case study exercise in an interview setting provides the hiring committee an active assessment of how well the candidate performs in core firm activities.

The case study is valued so highly that you performance on this task accounts for at least 50% of your determining score. It cannot be emphasized enough that it is crucial for you to prepare for these kinds of interviews. Doing well on this portion of the management consulting interview weighs heavily on you getting hired by the firm. If you are looking for an offer at one of the leading consulting firms, the best thing to do is practice, practice and practice some more. You cannot practice enough for the case study stage of the interview; when you are sure you have done enough, you need to go back and do more.

Landing a job at a management consulting firm is no easy task, but you can increase your chances of getting hired by doing your homework ahead of time. Take the case study interview portion of the hiring process seriously and land the job of your dreams.

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STRUCTURE OF THE ST INTERVIEW

ST interviews normally last 30 to 40 minutes and are made up of three or four stations, each with a different theme. The exact duration, the number of stations and the themes will depend on each specialty, but are usually 10-12-minute long. Note that, as always, there are exceptions as some candidates have had interviews that included one single 30-minute station (more or less alongside the format of the "old" SHO or SpR interviews).

The type of stations vary from specialty to specialty, and in fact also from deanery to deanery. For example, some anaesthetics candidates in London have had almost exclusively clinical scenarios, whereas in Manchester the interviews were more balanced.

Globally speaking you are likely to have three or four stations taken from the following types:

Clinical station

This normally includes a range of clinical scenarios (e.g. emergencies) that you would normally be expected to handle. Some of the scenarios are straight forward, but others may be stretching you a little (i.e. you may not have met such situations in the past, but the interviewers would expect you to have a good educated guess).

Practical station

In some specialties, candidates may be asked to demonstrate practical procedures (e.g. intubating a dummy in anaesthesia, or suturing a tomato in ophthalmology). There is absolutely nothing that you can do to prepare for this station. Either you know or you don't. Practical stations tend to be reserved for surgery-related specialties.

General, Motivation & Teaching station

A number of deaneries and specialties have stations that are designated for generic questions. These tend to relate to your interest in the specialty and the deanery, together with your career plans and the manner in which you have developed your interest in the specialty. Usually the general station also deals with teaching skills.

Academic & Clinical Governance station

Most interviews will have an academic station. In some interviews, there can actually be two academic stations (e.g. one specifically on Research and Audit, and another one on other topics such as Teaching and Risk Management.

Academic stations take the form of a traditional question and answer session. For example you may be asked to talk about your most interesting audit. The interviewers will then dig into the detail of your experience e.g. how you selected the standard, what you role was, what changed as a result, etc.

Other questions will include your experience of Research, what you understand about research principles, questions on the importance of Research etc. Such questions can be daunting at first, but if you are well prepared, you can really shine.

Critical Appraisal station

In several specialties (e.g. ophthalmology, general surgery), candidates have been asked to critically appraise a paper, at all ST levels, including ST1.

Preparation time varied between 20 and 40 minutes, followed by a 5 to 10 minute presentation. As part of a critical appraisal station, you are expected to demonstrate an understanding of how critical appraisals should be approached and you should also be able to answer any questions that the interviewers have on the paper that you have just read. This could include questions of a clinical nature, based on the topic being discussed; it also often includes questions on research principles such as "What is a p-value?" or "What are the ethical issues involved in this paper?".

Experience of research is a definite advantage to succeed in this station. Having said that, attendance at journal clubs is also a good way of preparing yourself for it, particularly at the lower ST grades.

Role Play

In some specialties, role play has been introduced. Role play was already an integral part of SpR interviews for some specialties such as Obs & Gynae but it has been extended to other specialties in some of the deaneries, including psychiatry (e.g. dealing with a father who wants some news on his over-18 admitted daughter), ophthalmology (e.g. breaking bad news and counselling a patient on glaucoma) and several others.

In many ways, role-play stations are similar to those used for the recruitment of GP trainees. Their main aim is not to test your clinical skills & knowledge (this is achieved in others ways in proper clinical stations) but to test your approach towards patients and your communication skills. The clinical content of the role play section is therefore limited as they concentrate instead on your empathy, your listening skills, your ability to summarise information in a simple language, your ability to deal with anger and conflict calmly and sensibly, and your ability to build a rapport with a patient in sometimes difficult circumstances.

The role play stations usually include actors who have been briefed accordingly. Having said that, the role is sometimes played by an interviewer. There have been occasions where role-play was introduced unexpectedly in a normal clinical station, or an ethics station. The station would start normally with a few general question such as "How would you deal with a patient who ...". Half-way through the station one of the interviewers will tell you that he is now the patient and that he wants you to act your answer out. This can be somewhat disconcerting and you should therefore be prepared for the worst, even if you have not explicitly been told that you will have a role play station.

TIP 4: Organise your answers

Many candidates' answers are made up of a long list of ideas, most of which are irrelevant or not backed up. There is no point putting across 20 ideas if the average human being can only remember 3 or 4 ideas at a time. You will just drown your interviewers in a mass of information they can't digest. As a result they will either lose interest and start looking through the window, or they will get a headache trying to make sense of it all. Put yourself in their shoes! They have been sitting there listening to the same old answers from everyone. Make their job easy, don't make them think too much, organise the information for them. In our experience, those who get the jobs are not those who have an absolutely flawless content in their answers. They are those who have a good structure and make them personal, even if they only have 70% of the expected content.

TIP 5: be personal

For each question, there are a number of points that can be raised. Most people who have prepared will automatically come up with these points and, in order to make a difference, you will need to personalise your answers otherwise you will sound the same as everyone else. Depending on the question that you have been asked, this can be achieved in different ways.

If the question is about your interpersonal skills, try to bring in a few examples that

demonstrate your experience. For example when discussing team playing, describe

situations where you gained experience of team work. You should not go into too much detail but be specific enough to be credible.

Steer clear of definitions and grand statements. An interview is a conversation, not a speech or a verbal essay. You need to appear natural and confident in what you say. Do not be scared of expressing your ideas in your own words. For example, when is the last time you used the word "flourish" at home or at work? So why insist in using it in your description of Clinical Governance? Too many people try to explain simple ideas using pompous words because they feel it makes them sound better. In reality it makes them sound vague, theoretical and, sometimes, confused ... the interviewers are confused too.

Don't be afraid of expressing how you feel, what you liked, why you enjoyed it, etc. They want to recruit human beings, not clones. Also, talking about feelings helps being out your enthusiasm and passion for what you do. No one has ever sounded passionate talking about.

TIP 6: Stop obsessing about your body language

There is little point in worrying about how you cross you fingers or your legs if what comes out of your mouth makes no sense. Body language is not part of the marking sheet interviewers have. In fact most people will ignore your body language unless it is really bad, in which case it most probably means that you have very little confidence and therefore that your answers are also very bad.

Most people have a normal body language and interviewers will make allowances for the fact that you are a bit nervous. If you spend the time preparing well for your interview, you will gain much more confidence in yourself and your body language will follow naturally. The more you think about your body, the less you are able to think about your answers.

TIP 7: Do not spend month learning about the minutia of NHS issues

There is always a danger in knowing too much about one subject: they can ask you for more detail until you fall on your own sword. At our last count, there were over 95 possible NHS issues you could be asked at an interview. Even if you spend just 20 minutes on each, it would still take you over 30 hours of work. And that's just for the basics.

Instead concentrate and spend some proper time on 5 or 6 key issues of importance either because they are of actuality or because they are of close concern to your specialty. But do not confine yourself to learning the basic facts otherwise you will go back to the realm of ready-made answers. At ST interviews, you will be expected to show an understanding of the issue but also of it consequences and practical applications. So spend your time wisely by discussing the issues with colleagues and debating them. You will then start thinking about those issues in different ways and will gain a personal understanding of them that will enable you to discuss them freely at a medical interview.

A face-to-face interview is the toughest part of getting you a job. Further, if you are from a science or a medical background, the situation becomes worst. Science is a vast subject and you need to cover a great deal of topics before going for an interview. If you are a medical professional or a doctor then, you must know that a doctor’s job involves competence, technical expertise, integrity and social ethics. Therefore, a medical job interview is considered to be one of the toughest job interviews.

This article covers a few questions that are generally asked in course of a medical interview. You need to go through this list and prepare potential, impressive answers for them. The first question is the most commonly asked questions. I have mentioned an answer to it.

7. The day before your final exam, one of your family members has expired. How will you deal with this situation? How will you manage your studies in such a crisis?

8. A young woman suffering from AIDS comes over to your clinic and requests you not to inform her spouse about it. What will you do?

9. A 7 year old child is suffering from cancer. The kid’s life expectancy is approximately five months. How will you tell her parents about it?

So, these were some of the question you may encounter on the road to become a doctor. You should answer them in a composed manner. And remember, besides being a doctor, you are a human too! So keep up the dignity of this post.

Consultant Medical Interview Guide

Are You Ready For Your Job Interview With Stryker?

Here, I'll focus on ten critical steps to prepare for management consulting interview rounds. As general advice, by far the best way to become a distinctive interviewer is to get live experience - thus the reason why you should spread a wide net in your search for different consulting firms.

Getting ready for case studies

1. Read Case In Point - a thorough, 100% case study-focused resource

2. Peruse Victor Cheng's website - as a former McKinsey consultant, Victor has a strong grasp of successful case study techniques and strategies

3. Practice online case studies - most firm websites have plenty of cases (some like Bain even have video case studies). The key is to answer the question yourself before reading the suggested answer. There are good consulting websites with case study materials as well, including Rice's Consulting Club

1. Wear something that looks clean, sharp, and makes you feel confident - first appearances are deceptively powerful. Dress like a management consultant, and people will think you deserve an offer.

2. Talk to current and former consultants - the better you understand the job and lifestyle, the more comfortable you are with consulting lingo like "on the beach" and "5,000 mile view", the better you'll do. It's also great for recruiting and networking.

That wraps up our tour of how to prepare for business consulting interviews. Good luck!

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There are a lot of articles on how to prepare for the interview, but knowing what not to do is often as important as knowing what to do.

Our team of medical recruiters see these 7 mistakes over and over. Make sure you do not make any of these blunders during your next medical sales interview.

1. Not dressing for the job
2. Not bringing copies of your resume
3. Texting or picking up a phone on a ride along
4. Not having good questions for the hiring manager
5. Talking about salary/ commission before the interviewer brings it up
6. Talking negatively about your old company/boss
7. Not asking for the job

1. Talking about salary/commission before the interviewer brings it up. We all know medical sales representatives should be money motivated and commission driven, but do not make the mistake of just talking about money and how much commission you can make. Never bring up money before the interviewer does. Sales Managers want someone who is going to drive the sales and wants to make great money, but more importantly they want someone who has a proven track record of success, knows products, the territory, culture of the company and can be a team player. Let the hiring manager find out about you and lead the money conversation.

6. Talking negatively about your old company/boss. Another question that always comes up on an interview is "Tell me why you are looking." At this point do not blunder and say anything negative about your current company or boss, even if that is exactly why you are looking. Managers will be wary of you and think you do not get along with others and may even be concerned you will speak badly of them in the future.

7. Not asking for the job. Sales 101, always close the interview. Sales managers are going to think you will not ask for the business if you cannot ask for the job. Always close the interview by letting the hiring manager know you are interested. More candidates are knocked out of the interview process for this blunder.

Now that you have read our Top 7 Blunders during a Medical Sales Interview, you will be sure not to make them on your next interview and be well on your way to you dream medical sales job.

A face-to-face interview is the toughest part of getting you a job. Further, if you are from a science or a medical background, the situation becomes worst. Science is a vast subject and you need to cover a great deal of topics before going for an interview. If you are a medical professional or a doctor then, you must know that a doctor’s job involves competence, technical expertise, integrity and social ethics. Therefore, a medical job interview is considered to be one of the toughest job interviews.

This article covers a few questions that are generally asked in course of a medical interview. You need to go through this list and prepare potential, impressive answers for them. The first question is the most commonly asked questions. I have mentioned an answer to it.

7. The day before your final exam, one of your family members has expired. How will you deal with this situation? How will you manage your studies in such a crisis?

8. A young woman suffering from AIDS comes over to your clinic and requests you not to inform her spouse about it. What will you do?

9. A 7 year old child is suffering from cancer. The kid’s life expectancy is approximately five months. How will you tell her parents about it?

So, these were some of the question you may encounter on the road to become a doctor. You should answer them in a composed manner. And remember, besides being a doctor, you are a human too! So keep up the dignity of this post.

Consultant Medical Interview Guide

Great Tips For a Medical Interview

If you are a new medical assistant and ready to start working so I must advise you my friend to kick start your job hunt - and get your first medical assistant job position with these wonderful tips!!

a) Work hard in your Internship!

Excelling as an intern can significantly improve your chances of finding a job after graduation as a medical assistant. Many students are hired at their internship places just by showing they have a excellent attitude, are eager to learn and get along well with the existing staff.

So be ready to work hard at your interns!

Also note that internship classmates will become your best references when you apply for jobs on other places.

Finally!

f) Someone will Of-course Give You a Chance

Be deficient in experience won't necessarily trouble new grads, you should be honest.

Tell a potential employer, 'Yes, I am fresh out of school, but I'm willing to learn.'

A lot of employers out there will give a fresh grad a start. After all, someone gave them a chance!!

So keep your fingers crossed and make a plan for your new interview on above tips, I am sure they are going to help you a lot to find your first medical assistant job!

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You are what you wear, and the clothes make the man, so they say. While you got your management consulting interview based on your hard work and credentials, you cannot discount the impact that visual impressions contribute to the overall picture. How you appear and the attire you wear will convey a serious message to your hiring committee. There are some simple ways to guarantee that you will look professional. Just follow some basic rules on what to and what not to wear.

Human resources executives at McKinsey and BCG, among others, widely concur that simplicity is key in choosing your interview wardrobe. You should avoid wearing anything flashy or over the top. You want to look smart and put together, which means you need to pay attention to the details, such as pressing your suit the night before. You don't want to show up for your management consulting interview looking like you gathered your clothing from the bottom of the laundry hamper or a suitcase. All of this may seem basic in terms of interviewing etiquette, but according to current employees at Booz, they have seen it all. Wrinkles, among other little visual details, may leave a lasting - and negative - impression in the minds of the hiring committee.

AT Kearney consultants recommend, as most management consulting teams do, that the key to dressing appropriately for your interview is to keep it simple and comfortable. You don't want to wear restrictive clothing that cuts off the circulation mid-meeting or trip over your own feet because you insisted on wearing impractically high four-inch high heels.

Dress for success and never overdo it. The last thing you want to do during your management consulting interview is worry about a wardrobe malfunction or whether your outfit is costing you the job. By focusing less on the wardrobe, and paying attention to the overall impression you are making, you will be able to spend more time honing your interviewing skills and researching the company.

Take the route of least resistance when it comes to selecting your wardrobe. Think business attire, and don't deviate from the plan. It is better to be a little understated than over the top.

A face-to-face interview is the toughest part of getting you a job. Further, if you are from a science or a medical background, the situation becomes worst. Science is a vast subject and you need to cover a great deal of topics before going for an interview. If you are a medical professional or a doctor then, you must know that a doctor’s job involves competence, technical expertise, integrity and social ethics. Therefore, a medical job interview is considered to be one of the toughest job interviews.

This article covers a few questions that are generally asked in course of a medical interview. You need to go through this list and prepare potential, impressive answers for them. The first question is the most commonly asked questions. I have mentioned an answer to it.

7. The day before your final exam, one of your family members has expired. How will you deal with this situation? How will you manage your studies in such a crisis?

8. A young woman suffering from AIDS comes over to your clinic and requests you not to inform her spouse about it. What will you do?

9. A 7 year old child is suffering from cancer. The kid’s life expectancy is approximately five months. How will you tell her parents about it?

So, these were some of the question you may encounter on the road to become a doctor. You should answer them in a composed manner. And remember, besides being a doctor, you are a human too! So keep up the dignity of this post.

Consultant Medical Interview Questions And Answers

Medical Job Interviews - 4 Great Tips to Ace the Interview

Are you fortunate enough to have an upcoming interview for medical school? If you've taken the big step and applied for admissions, there are some things that you can do to properly prepare yourself and put yourself ahead of your competitors.

Depending on the school, the interview panel will consist of faculty members and/or medical students. The panel may have one person or it may have five. It would be a good idea to familiarize yourself with the school's process before going to the interview. No matter how many people are on the panel, or what the process is like, the expectations are the same. Every university is looking for the best candidates, and every candidate wants to gain admissions.

What the Panel is Looking for in a Candidate

If you have made it to the interview, it means that you have already proven yourself on paper. Now it is time to let yourself shine in person. The interview panel will want to see a lot of personality and confidence. You can expect to sell yourself to the panel. In order to do so you will need to boost your confidence. Ask yourself these three fundamental questions before going into the interview, and know the answers well.

The more rehearsed you are, the better - though you don't want to appear robotic or scripted. Try to prepare yourself for the interview by getting to know some of the most common questions, and rehearsing the answers out loud.

Some common interview questions that you can expect are:

1. Tell me about yourself?

2. Why are you interested in becoming a doctor?

3. What are your greatest academic accomplishments?

4. Tell me about the Hippocratic Oath?

5. What have you done to prepare yourself for medical school?

6. What is your opinion of the insurance industry?

7. Why would you be a good doctor?

8. What has your pre-med experience been like?

9. Where do you see yourself in 10 years?

10. Do you have any questions for me?

Regarding question 10, the answer should always be yes. Always come prepared with questions. It shows that you are eager, prepared and serious about attending their school. Remember, it is all about standing out above the rest and letting your personality shine through.

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