Consultant

Great Tips For a Medical Interview

To help you prepare for your Management Consultant Interview, here are some typical questions you can expect to hear...

Behaviour/Skill: Decisiveness

Definition: Takes personal responsibility for decisions having considered both the short and long term implications.

Questions:

1) Describe a situation where you were required to 'think on your feet' and come up with a quick decision in response to a colleague or customer:

a) What was the situation?

b) What was your immediate response?

c) What decision(s) did you arrive at?

d) What was the final outcome?

2) Tell us about a time when you had to analyze a problem based on incomplete information and decide on a solution:

a) What was the problem?

b) What was the information available?

c) What was the information missing?

d) What was your decision?

Behaviour/Skill: Teamwork

Definition: Working with others to accomplish objectives by respecting the needs and contributions of those involved.

Questions:

1) Can you give us examples of how you ensure that your team works as a cohesive unit towards goals?

a) Actions?

b) How define goals?

c) Results?

2) Can you give us an example of working with other areas of the office to ensure the efficiency of the business?

a) How were these measurement standards and/or feedback systems developed?

b) What useful information has the feedback given you?

c) Give one or two examples of how you personally have used this feedback?

d) What benefits has this delivered - for the business? For the customer?

Behaviour/Skill: Making Things Happen

Definition: Delivers results in line with strategic and operational plans. Has a 'can do, will do' approach to delivering consistently high performance and inspires others to also achieve high standards.

Questions:

1) Describe a project or task you managed which required you to organise scant resources to achieve an important deadline:

a) How did you determine your priorities?

b) Did you have to modify the plan?

2) Give an example of a time when you had to "juggle" a number of important activities or priorities at once:

a) What problems did this present you with?

b) What steps did you take to deal with the situation?

c) What was the final outcome?

These are typical questions which you can expect to be asked...so prepare with real examples and ensure you 'wow' the interviewer.

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Interview Questions to Ask a Potential Medical Billing and Coding Specialist

Are you fortunate enough to have an upcoming interview for medical school? If you’ve taken the big step and applied for admissions, there are some things that you can do to properly prepare yourself and put yourself ahead of your competitors.

Depending on the school, the interview panel will consist of faculty members and/or medical students. The panel may have one person or it may have five. It would be a good idea to familiarize yourself with the school’s process before going to the interview. No matter how many people are on the panel, or what the process is like, the expectations are the same. Every university is looking for the best candidates, and every candidate wants to gain admissions.

What the Panel is Looking for in a Candidate

If you have made it to the interview, it means that you have already proven yourself on paper. Now it is time to let yourself shine in person. The interview panel will want to see a lot of personality and confidence. You can expect to sell yourself to the panel. In order to do so you will need to boost your confidence. Ask yourself these three fundamental questions before going into the interview, and know the answers well.

The more rehearsed you are, the better – though you don’t want to appear robotic or scripted. Try to prepare yourself for the interview by getting to know some of the most common questions, and rehearsing the answers out loud.

Some common interview questions that you can expect are:

1. Tell me about yourself?

2. Why are you interested in becoming a doctor?

3. What are your greatest academic accomplishments?

4. Tell me about the Hippocratic Oath?

5. What have you done to prepare yourself for medical school?

6. What is your opinion of the insurance industry?

7. Why would you be a good doctor?

8. What has your pre-med experience been like?

9. Where do you see yourself in 10 years?

10. Do you have any questions for me?

Regarding question 10, the answer should always be yes. Always come prepared with questions. It shows that you are eager, prepared and serious about attending their school. Remember, it is all about standing out above the rest and letting your personality shine through.

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Sean McCarthy is president of SEEK Medical Consulting. Prior to starting his own company, McCarthy held several management positions in corporate America, including area sales manager, director of sales, director of strategic marketing and director of strategic business unit. During his sales management career, McCarthy interviewed in excess of 150 potential hires.

Recently, I had the opportunity to ask McCarthy the following question: "What is the best advice you can give someone who has been unsuccessful in obtaining a sales position?

McCarthy didn't hesitate. "You should come in prepared to show how your past success will translate to the future. Ask the interviewer what qualities he or she is looking for in the position, and then show the interviewer why you have those qualities. Finally, close and get agreement that you are the right person."

McCarthy's answer demonstrates four selling skills that all sales managers want to see in someone they interview:

1. "Come prepared to show how your past successes would translate to the future." Every sales manager wants salespeople to be prepared when they meet with a customer.

In the sales arena, thorough knowledge of your products' features and benefits demonstrates your level of preparedness. Knowing those features and benefits enables a salesperson to persuade customers to purchase the product.

However, in those situations where the interviewer appears non-committal or indifferent, asking for the job will force the interviewer to let you know how enthusiastic he or she is about offering you a position. Lack of enthusiasm on the part of the interviewer will provide you another opportunity to probe, listen and uncover objections or concerns in order to provide an appropriate short story or clarify something you said earlier in the interview.

Once you have answered all the interviewer's concerns, it will seem very natural to get an agreement that you are the right person for the job. If you walk away from the interview without answering all the interviewer's concerns, you probably will not have a second opportunity to do so. For this reason, asking for the job is an important step in an interview.

McCarthy offers excellent advice on acquiring a sales position. Enhance your chance to receive a job offer by following his four tips:

1. Prepare to explain how your past successes will translate to future success.

2. Probe to find out what qualities are necessary for success in the sales position.

3. Listen and supply proof that you have those qualities.

4. Close and get agreement that you are the right person for the position.

 Interview Preparation Questions